Galerie moderního umění
v Hradci Králové

Collection of Central and Eastern Europe

The Collection of Central and Eastern Europe was established in 2019. It focuses on artists who come from Central and Eastern Europe, whose works created after 2000 can be regarded as chefs-d’oeuvre. The purpose of the collection is to explore possible links and ties among authors from the V4 states (Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Poland), followed by artists from Albania, Croatia, Serbia, Northern Macedonia, Bulgaria, Romania, Moldova, Lithuania, Latvia, and Estonia. Furthermore, the collection seeks to foster interest in natural integration of various artistic expressions, positions, generations as well as geography-specific works of art. What is more, the collection aims to initiate exhibitions and research projects based on cooperation with artists and cultural institutions of the countries mentioned above. Finally, the collection will help integrate GMU into international context.

Usual interpretation of art and history follows two timelines – national and world. Such an interpretation is inevitably prone to lose interconnection and links. The methodology and collecting strategy of the Collection of Central and Eastern Europe uses a completely different apparatus for evaluation, which is primarily based on comparison of works by authors from similar cultural and geographical areas. It is based on the conviction that a national history cannot be viewed in isolation; it only becomes meaningful in the context of events and historical events surrounding it.

As of today, the collection has pieces by the following artists: When Labour Becomes Form by Lucia Tkáčová and Anetta Mona Chisa, Untitled – Moscow Diary by Anna Daučíková or CZ_SK_HU_D_PL by Dalibor Bača.

Anna Daučíková, MOSCOW DIARY, 1989

Anna Daučíková, MOSCOW DIARY, 1989

View of the exhibition The Last Fifty Years

Anetta Mona Chisa & Lucie Tkáčová, When Labour Becomes Form, 2007

Bača Dalibor, CZ_SK_HU_D_PL, 2014 © Dalibor Bača

Bača Dalibor, CZ_SK_HU_D_PL, 2014 © Dalibor Bača